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NCBiotech News

  • Research Triangle Park-based agribusiness Syngenta Biotechnology Inc. (SBI) is getting ready to plow down some of its property to rebuild for the future.
  • An initial $50 million licensing payment to High Point pharmaceutical developer TransTech Pharma could grow to more than $1.1 billion from Forest Laboratories. TransTech, which won the North Carolina Biotechnology Economic Development Award in 2008, got the up-front money for signing a license agreement letting Forest develop and commercialize TransTech diabetes chemicals.
  • Talecris Biotherapeutics, a fast-growing Research Triangle Park company, expects to maintain its major footprint in North Carolina after the dust has settled on its announced $3.4 billion buyout from Spanish firm Grifols. Talecris announced last November it would invest nearly $270 million over seven years to expand its manufacturing facilities near Clayton, adding 259 new employees to the 1,800 it already has at the Johnston County facility.
  • The Greater Charlotte region is positioned to absorb a large-scale recruitment project, according to the North Carolina Biopharma Manufacturing Labor Market Analysis. The analysis was put together by New Jersey-based site section and economic development consultants Biggins, Lacy, Shapiro & Co.
  • The Triangle region is positioned to absorb a large-scale recruitment project, according to the North Carolina Biopharma Manufacturing Labor Market Analysis. The analysis was put together by New Jersey-based site section and economic development consultants Biggins, Lacy, Shapiro & Co.
  • The Piedmont Triad region is positioned to absorb a large-scale recruitment project, according to the North Carolina Biopharma Manufacturing Labor Market Analysis. The analysis was put together by New Jersey-based site section and economic development consultants Biggins, Lacy, Shapiro & Co.
  • By E. Norris Tolson 1 June 2010 The News & Observer This year, of all years, North Carolina needs to hold fast to its commitment to bioscience as a jobs-growth engine.
  • A Research Triangle Park-based contract testing company is among the North Carolina firms working to reduce pollution problems from the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. ILS, formerly known as Integrated Laboratory Systems, sent an emergency response team to the Gulf Coast on April 28, a week after the Deepwater Horizon platform and oil rig exploded, killing 11 and spewing destruction into the Gulf. ILS' Environmental Services Assistance Team is normally housed in the Environmental Protection Agency's Region 4 facility in Athens, Georgia.
  • Bio Briefs with names making news
  • Two major contract research and testing companies with significant operations in North Carolina have signed three-year contracts with drug giant Bristol-Myers Squibb for clinical development of new drugs. Parexel International and Icon PLC have agreed to help Bristol with what the global firm said was a large volume of clinical-development work.
  • Bio Briefs with names making news Wilmington-based contract research and testing firm PPD has appointed Mike Wilkinson, Ph.D., as executive vice president and chief information officer and Paul Colvin as executive vice president of global clinical development, effective June 30. More
  • Get the lead out if you want to bring the bread in. The Biotechnology Center has identified at least 164 North Carolina firms developing new medical therapies that are eligible to apply until next Wednesday, July 21, for up to $5 million each in federal tax credits and grants. The windfall is possible because of the Qualified Therapeutic Discovery Project tax credit, part of the federal healthcare reform act. Eligible therapies: Fill an umnet medical need Reduce healthcare costs, or
  • Big pharma is putting its money on Tranzyme Pharma. Tranzyme, a 7-year-old Research Triangle Park-based clinical-stage pharmaceutical company, started with the help of a $150,000 Biotechnology Center loan in 2003. The firm has received more than $250 million in partnership agreements in recent months from drug giants Bristol-Myers Squibb and Europe's Norgine B.V.
  • There's a $500,000 grant out there for the taking, if you're an academic scientist or engineer seeking answers to biological questions. The Burroughs Wellcome Fund is inviting pre-proposals from people who would like to nominate themselves for the annual Career Award at the Scientific Interface, designed "to bridge advanced postdoctoral training and the first three years of faculty service." It's aimed at advancing the careers of physical, chemical or computational science researchers and engineers whose work addresses biological questions.
  • By Jim Shamp, Senior Editor Life-science innovation and commercialization have put North Carolina on the map, and mayors across the state say they want to keep the momentum going. They weren't alone Tuesday -- Gov. Beverly Perdue and former Congressman Dick Gephardt, among others, joined them with messages of agreement and support.
  • Cary-based specialty pharmaceutical company Cornerstone Therapeutics and Maryland's MedImmune have ended a drug-development relationship targeting new treatments for inflammation. The firms said they mutually ended the 7-year-old agreement, but gave no reason.
  • John Draper, well known across North Carolina as an entrepreneurship leader, died unexpectedly last weekend. Draper, 63, was president and director of the First Flight Venture Center incubator in Research Triangle Park. Previously, Draper had served as the Chief Financial Officer and Director of Operations for the state's Technological Development Authority, which became First Flight.
  • Original. It's what The Honorable Dr. Chih-Liang Yaung, the Taiwanese Minister of Health, said after hearing about the many years of thought and effort that went into building the state's biotechnology industry.

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