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News from BIO

When it comes to the $24 billion outsourced drug development industry, North Carolina is the undisputed – and still undefeated – heavyweight champion of the world. It's home to 128 contract research organizations employing over 21,000 people within the state and tens of thousands of others around the world.

North Carolina has substantial university and company assets devoted to health informatics, a quickly evolving SuperScieNCe field that uses databases, electronic medical records, bioinformatics and other tools to support clinical decisions that improve health care efficiency, delivery and outcomes.

Delivering precise treatments customized for each person’s unique genetic makeup is the powerful promise of personalized medicine, and North Carolina is already a leader in this new era of genomics-based health care.

Companies and university researchers across North Carolina are harnessing compounds, microorganisms and unique materials to bring advanced wound healing, surgical devices and regenerative medicine to civilian and military markets.

North Carolina is one of the world’s leading centers for the manufacture of biologics, pharmaceuticals, vaccines, diagnostics, medical devices and related products.

A study of the state’s life science landscape by the Battelle lists crop genetic engineering as one of six emerging life science technology sectors likely to flourish into the future. The  Technology Partnership Practice

North Carolina’s life science sector grew four times faster than that of the rest of the nation over the last decade. Even so, a study of the state’s industry says the best is yet to come, as the state builds on its “SuperSciNCe” – its prodigious research and innovation strengths in such growing markets as medicine, agriculture, biomanufacturing and health informatics.

Durham drug development company Vascular BioSciences (VBS) has hit the big-time, chosen as one of this year’s two most highly innovative biotechnology companies.

Biogen Idec’s Machelle Sanders, GlaxoSmithKline’s David Stewart and BTEC's Nathaniel Hentz discussed the importance of North Carolina's workforce talent preparation to the state's biomanufacturing leadership, on a panel at the BIO International Convention.

Life science jobs in North Carolina have increased 7 percent since 2007, to more than 66,000 by the end of 2012. And despite the overall economic struggle to claw back from the Great Recession, life science salaries in the state rose nearly 13 percent, to $82,000, says a new report from Battelle,