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Jim Shamp

Director of Public Relations
Phone number: 
919-549-8889
E-mail: 
jim_shamp@ncbiotech.org

Jim Shamp writes and edits news and other Web copy, brochures and other internal and external Biotechnology Center materials, and supports the Corporate Communications unit’s marketing and media relations activities.

Background

Shamp joined the Biotechnology Center in 2005, after more than eight years as science and health reporter for the Durham Herald-Sun. He brought to NCBiotech nearly four decades of professional experience in writing, editing, marketing and advertising. This includes some 18 years of newspaper, broadcast, wire service and Web journalism in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and North Carolina as well as a decade of public-relations activity at major global pharmaceutical companies' headquarters in Michigan and North Carolina. He has also started or been involved in establishing several entrepreneurial ventures.

He participates in a variety of professional, community-service and educational boards and committees, including the National Association of Science Writers.

Shamp holds a B.S. degree in communications from Manchester (Ind.) College (now Manchester University).

Blogs

The North Carolina Biotechnology Center has been expanding its support for marine biotechnology during the past decade, and it’s proving to be a great investment for the state.

 

-- Shutterstock image

Cempra is a Chapel Hill company that’s developing antibiotics to treat scary bacterial infections.

Besides the four active Nobel Laureates conducting research at Duke and UNC, here are 13 others with N.C. connections who have also won the major global recognition.

When a chorus of cheers accompanies announcements like the $1.85 billion Novo Nordisk expansion in Clayton, the echo is a reminder: it's a team effort.

Two key state funding programs are proving to be a great match to get new North Carolina life science companies off the ground.

Life science entrepreneurs routinely turn to the loan options available from the North Carolina Biotechnology Center after tapping friends, family and credit cards. But many of those same NCBiotech portfolio companies also get much-needed early survival lifelines in the form of grants from the One North Carolina Small Business Fund, managed by the state Department of Commerce’s N.C. Office of Science, Technology and Innovation.

As we weigh the GSK layoff announcement, let’s be glad for what we have and celebrate what’s to come. Sure, things will never be the same. But the fact is, they never were anyway.

Certified Financial Planner Lisa Gabriel provided useful financial tips for people facing job loss during the September 29 Jobs Network gathering at NCBiotech.

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases just added $4.1 million to a $22 million, five-year grant made a year ago, to help BioCryst develop an anti-viral drug that could prevent a terrible Ebola outbreak -- next time one happens.

Bob Ingram is one of those rare people who can spin a roomful of people in circles with words. He did it again this week as he accepted a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Triangle Business Journal. And appropriately enough, the room he was spinning was the classy ballroom at the Umstead Hotel in Cary.

Lab photo courtesy of Arbovax, Inc.

The attack of the chikungunya ogre could augur well for Arbovax.

Say that three times fast. Then tell somebody I told you so.

Articles

Raleigh bioscience startup Locus Biosciences, a spinout of North Carolina State University, is using a version of the hot gene-editing technology called CRISPR to cut a new path to the discovery and development of novel antibiotics.

Oliver Smithies, D.Phil., who was recruited to North Carolina with grant funding from the North Carolina Biotechnology Center and won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 20 years later, died today at the age of 91.

G1 Therapeutics, a clinical-stage oncology company based in Research Triangle Park, is expanding its search for new anti-cancer weapons by launching three more clinical trials targeting breast cancer.

Durham’s GeneCentric Diagnostics has received an undisclosed sum of equity funding for a biomarker research collaboration with pharmaceutical giant Bristol-Myers Squibb.

RAUMEDIC, a family-owned German company, is nearing its first anniversary at its $27 million development and production facility in western North Carolina.

Research Triangle Park–based curasan Inc. is poised for growth in 2017, thanks to an important December 2016 milestone for its synthetic bone regeneration material CERASORB Ortho FOAM.

Two years after announcing plans for a yeast production facility in Asheville, West Coast fermentation specialty company White Labs is about to start “Yeast Coast” production at its new factory in January 2017.

North Carolina’s world-leading contract research industry got another boost today when INC Research announced plans to move its global headquarters from Raleigh to nearby Morrisville and add 550 jobs over five years.

East Carolina University, First Flight Venture Center in RTP and the Durham-based Investors’ Circle have received federal grants to help promote entrepreneurship development programs.

First Flight Venture Center (FFVC), a Research Triangle Park science and technology incubator for entrepreneurs, has been awarded a $450,000 challenge grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce.

FFVC was among 36 organizations, selected from a pool of more than 215 applicants, to receive a total of $15 million from the federal Regional Innovation Strategies (RIS) program.